blog.up-link.ro android bsd linux unix & open-source world

8Mar/120

Ubuntu: How to install the Classic Desktop in Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot)

Ubuntu 11.10 will not include the classic GNOME desktop which is available alongside Unity in Ubuntu 11.04. Ubuntu 11.10 will automatically use Unity as its default session and fall back to Unity 2D for those whose computers do not support 3D graphics. But if you truly want to go back to Ubuntu Classic Desktop without Unity, then this tutorial will show you how to do it easily. All that’s requires is installing a few extra packages and performing a tweak here and there.

Print This Post Print This Post
4Feb/121

FreeBSD: How to set up an UPnP Internet Gateway Device (IGD) with MiniUPnP and FreeBSD 9.0

Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) is a set of networking protocols that permits networked devices, such as personal computers, printers, Internet gateways, Wi-Fi access points and mobile devices to seamlessly discover each other's presence on the network and establish functional network services for data sharing, communications, and entertainment.

The MiniUPnP project offers software which supports the UPnP Internet Gateway Device (IGD) specifications.

For the purposes of this article I'll assume you're familiar with setting up NAT under FreeBSD using OpenBSD Packet Filter. I'll also assume that your machine is up, routing and translating traffic correctly and is protected by OpenBSD Packet Filter (PF).

Print This Post Print This Post
29Jan/123

Ubuntu: How to build and install Linksys AE1000 Wireless-N linux driver on Ubuntu 11.10

Cisco Linksys AE1000 provides high performance wireless network connectivity for any desktop or laptop computer. The range and data transfer rate achieved by its Wi-Fi Certified N technology rival that of a wired network without the inconvenience and complexity of being tethered. At home or in an office environment, the device makes network connectivity simple and flexible. At public hot spots like cafés or hotels, making an internet connection is secure and fast.

Print This Post Print This Post
27Dec/110

FreeBSD: How to Install and Configure a PPTP VPN server with mpd5 on FreeBSD 8.2

The Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is a method for implementing virtual private networks. PPTP uses a control channel over TCP and a GRE tunnel operating to encapsulate PPP packets.

In this document we will see how to install and configure Mpd5 as a PPTP server, allowing remote VPN connections. This setup has been tested and works well on FreeBSD 8.2 system and Mpd version 5.5.

Print This Post Print This Post
23Nov/110

Linux: How to shrink a Logical Volume with LVM

LVM is a logical volume manager for the Linux kernel. It manages disk drives and similar mass-storage devices, in particular large ones. The term "volume" refers to a disk drive or partition thereof. LVM was originally written in 1998 by Heinz Mauelshagen, who based its design on that of the LVM in HP-UX.

The LVM can:
- Resize volume groups online by absorbing new physical volumes (PV) or ejecting existing ones.
- Resize logical volumes (LV) online by concatenating extents onto them or truncating extents from them.
- Create read-only snapshots of logical volumes (LVM1).
- Create read-write snapshots of logical volumes (LVM2).
- Stripe whole or parts of logical volumes across multiple PVs, in a fashion similar to RAID 0.
- Mirror whole or parts of logical volumes, in a fashion similar to RAID 1.
- Move online logical volumes between PVs.
- Split or merge volume groups in situ (as long as no logical volumes span the split). This can be useful when migrating whole logical volumes to or from offline storage.

In this article I'll show you how to shrink a LVM Volume Safely.

Print This Post Print This Post
30Jul/110

FreeBSD: How To Enable ccache on FreeBSD 8.2

ccache is a software development tool that caches the output of C/C++ compilation so that the next time, the same compilation can be avoided and the results can be taken from the cache. This can greatly speed up recompiling time.

The following is a step by step guide to how to enable and use ccache on FreeBSD 8.2.

Install ccache by running the following command:

make install clean -C /usr/ports/devel/ccache
Print This Post Print This Post
23Jun/111

How To Enable Two-factor SSH authentication via Google Authenticator

In this tutorial I'll show you how to set up two-factor authentication for SSH using Google Authenticator. Two-factor authentication is where you authenticate to a service (SSH in our case) with two pieces of information: one you know, and one you don't. The information you know is your password (which can be stolen) while the information you don't know is a randomly-generated PIN number that changes every few seconds. So even if your password is stolen, unless an attacker has the means to get the right PIN (tied to a hardware device), they cannot log into the protected service.

Print This Post Print This Post
15May/111

FreeBSD: How To Install FreeBSD 8.x from USB Flash Drive

FreeBSD 8 can be installed from a USB memory stick. The required files can be downloaded via FTP:

i386: ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/amd64/ISO-IMAGES/8.2/FreeBSD-8.2-RELEASE-amd64-memstick.img
amd64: ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/amd64/ISO-IMAGES/8.2/FreeBSD-8.2-RELEASE-amd64-memstick.img

Insert the USB drive into the computer running Linux/FreeBSD and make sure it gets detect by the Kernel. You can check if the USB device got detect or not by running the following command:

dmesg
Print This Post Print This Post
31Dec/100

Linux: How To Create a USB Debian Installation Flash Drive

In this tutorial I'll show you how to create a USB drive which can be used as an installation media to install Debian Linux.

You will need a computer which is already running Linux and a USB flash drive of size at least 256 MB which we will prepare as our installation media.

Insert the USB drive into the computer running Linux and make sure it gets detect by the Linux Kernel. You can check if the USB device got detect or not by running the following command:

dmesg

and you should see something like this:

[143981.321725] sd 8:0:0:0: [sdb] .321725 512-byte hardware sectors (1024 MB)
[143981.522718] sd 8:0:0:0: [sdb] Write Protect is off
....
[143981.522719] sd 8:0:0:0: [sdb] Attached SCSI disk

Print This Post Print This Post
17Nov/100

How To Install QEMU under FreeBSD 8.1 as Host OS

QEMU is a processor emulator that relies on dynamic binary translation to achieve a reasonable speed while being easy to port on new host CPU architectures.
When used as a machine emulator, QEMU can run Operating Systems and programs made for one machine on a different machine. By using dynamic translation, it achieves very good performance.
When used as a virtualizer, QEMU achieves near native performances by executing the guest code directly on the host CPU.

1. Install QEMU

To install QEMU under FreeBSD, enter:

make install clean -C /usr/ports/emulators/qemu

Install QEMU with options showed in the following image:

Print This Post Print This Post